Genes May Affect Weight Gain

Comments: 0  | Leave A Comment

A new study indicates that genes may explain about fifty percent of weight gain that begins in middle age.

Researchers studied sets of twins who served in the military during the Vietnam War. Some of the twins were identical and shared the same genes, and the others were non-identical twins.After twenty years of follow-up, the study now shows that genes account for about 1/2 of the weight gain among the men. Environmental factors, such as exercise and diet account for the other 1/2. Researchers say the findings may help explain why some people find it hard to lose weight.

I Don’t Have Time To Exercise!

Your genes and how they effect your weightA new study indicates that genes may explain about fifty percent of weight gain that begins in middle age.  Researchers studied sets of twins who served in the military during the Vietnam War. Some of the twins were identical and shared the same genes, and the others were non-identical twins.

After twenty years of follow-up, the study now shows that genes account for about 1/2 of the weight gain among the men. Environmental factors, such as exercise and diet account for the other 1/2.Researchers say the findings may help explain why some people find it hard to lose weight. “We’re not acknowledging the strength of genetic factors in our weight loss strategies,” says James C. Romeis, PhD, professor of health services research at Saint Louis University School of Public Health, in a news release. “You’ve got this genetic thing working against you that helps to explain why you’re so heavy and why you may fail at weight loss programs and diets.”

Cancer Patients Must Exercise To Prevent Recurrence

In the study, which appeared in a recent issue of the journal Twin Research, researchers studied nearly 8,000 middle-aged, middle-class male twins who enlisted in the U.S. military during the late 1960s.At the time of their enlistment as young men more than 3/4s of them were considered normal weight, 17 percent were overweight, and 2.5 percent were obese or severely obese. Twenty years later, less than half of the men were still considered normal weight. Meanwhile, more than half had become overweight. The study showed that about 50 percent of the weight differences among the men appeared to be caused by genetic factors. Other aspects of their lifestyle and environment accounted for the rest. Although genetics may help to explain why some men gain weight more easily and have a harder time losing it, researchers say it should not stop them from trying to maintain a healthy weight, because weight gain doesn’t just happen overnight.

Join the Conversation! Share and Discuss!

Tags:

Comments

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 418 other followers